When you leave or return to the house, try to keep things as low key as possible – If you make greetings and goodbyes a big deal, it might contribute to your dog’s anxiety, or even reinforce the unwanted behavior. Your dog might be picking up on your pre-departure routines as well – things like picking up your keys or putting on your shoes. To reduce your pet’s negative associations with these departure cues, try to periodically do them without leaving the house.

Try giving your dog a KONG filled with a tasty treat – peanut butter, for instance. This will keep her preoccupied for 20-30 minutes and create a positive association with being alone. Medications, along with pheromone diffusers, thunder shirts and calming music can help manage anxiety, but training is really to only way to address the underlying problem. Crate training can be helpful, but only after the crate has been strongly established as a safe place.

If you have any concerns in regard to your pet’s anxiety, please schedule an appointment today.